Almost There!

 More footage of the United incident has surfaced.  Here's what O'Hare Police and United deem "unruly" and "belligerent." 

 

A Ju-Jitsu guide of how to handle being forcibly removed from a United flight.

 

A  Yorkshire terrier was sold on Craigslist just hours after he disappeared and an anonymous caller helped his owner get him back.

When Jeff Holden recently lost his tiny Yorkshire terrier Dobby, he went into panic mode. The Spokane Valley, Washington resident printed and posted fliers, knocked on doors in his neighborhood, posted in lost and found groups on Facebook and Craigslist, and even took out a photo ad in a local paper. He tried everything, but even the dog’s microchip company couldn’t help.

Holden says he had pretty much given up when a stranger called him, saying he’d seen his Craigslist ad at the same time he saw an ad from a woman who bought what she thought was a Yorkie puppy, and then realized it was a tiny adult dog.

It turns out Dobby had been sold on Craigslist within 24 hours of disappearing. Holden says the person who took his dog made up a story and sold him for $100. So he got in touch with the new “owner” and was able to get Dobby back. He still doesn’t know who the anonymous caller was, but says he’s “incredibly grateful to that gentleman.”

Source: Spokesman

Most drivers in the U.S. are guilty of risky behavior behind the wheel

  • A new report finds that overall, U.S. drivers score a “C” rating when it comes to their skills behind the wheel
  • 36% of all trips involve a driver going at least 10 miles per hour over the speed limit, while 38% involve a driver using a phone at least once, but since speeding lasts longer it’s more dangerous
  • Folks in the Midwest earn the highest safe driving rating at 83, followed by the West (82), South (80) and Northeast (75)

While most people probably think they’re pretty good drivers, a new report suggests that’s just not the case.

A survey by the Insurance online marketplace EverQuote finds that overall,  U.S. drivers score a C rating when it comes to their skills behind the wheel. The report analyzed data from more than 2.7 million car rides and 230 miles driven, looking at bad driver behavior like speeding, use of cellphones and more, and finds that out of a high score of 100, U.S. drivers would get only a 79, making them “C” students.

Speeding is a common risky behavior of American drivers, with 36% of all trips involving a driver going at least 10 miles per hour over the speed limit, earning them an average score of 79. Cellphone use is also particularly bad, with 38% of trips involving a driver using their phone, giving drivers a score of 80. And while those numbers may seem off because more people are using their phones than speeding, the issue is that folks speed for longer amounts of time per drive, making it more dangerous. And those aren’t the only bad behaviors behind the wheel. Drivers earned an 83 for breaking, 85 for risky acceleration and 86 for hard turns.

Overall, drivers in the Midwest earn the highest safe driving rating at 83, followed by the West (82), South (80) and Northeast (75). Northeasterners are particularly bad when it comes to speeding, with 48% of all trips clocking in at speeds above the legal limit. Drivers in the South are the worst when it comes to phone usage, with 41% using their phones behind the wheel, as compared to the rest of the country, while on average, women are slightly better drivers than men (78 vs. 77).

Source: Everqote

What's the strangest gift you've ever received from your boss?

  • A new survey finds that 66% of employees say they’d probably leave their job if they didn’t feel appreciated
  • 54% of senior managers admit that it’s fairly common for employees to leave a job if they don’t feel recognized by the higher ups
  • Employees have shared the strangest ways they’ve received recognition at the office, as well as some of the best 

When you work hard and put in a strong effort on the job it always feels good to be recognized, and it’s pretty apparent that hearing an “at a boy” from the boss is really important to a lot of people.

A new OfficeTeam survey finds that 66% of employees say they’d probably leave their job if they didn’t feel appreciated, with 54% of senior managers admitting it’s fairly common for employees to leave a job if they don’t feel recognized by the higher ups. 

But how those bosses express their recognition is a whole other story. Some execs have a strange way of showing their appreciation for employees, and workers have shared the odd ways they’ve been recognized at work. They include:

  • “A loaf of bread"
  • "A CD of music written and performed by a coworker"
  • "A custom statuette of me"
  • "Edible flowers"
  • "A large carving of a polar bear"
  • "An expired gift certificate"
  • "A golden key to an executive bathroom that didn't exist"
  • "Socks"
  • "A misspelled plaque"
  • "A plush toy"
  • "Fresh meat from a hunting trip"
  • "A foam tombstone"
  • "A jacket that was too short with sleeves that were too long"
  • "Grocery coupons"
  • "A $0.03 raise"

Of course, some bosses know exactly what to do to make their employees feel appreciated. Some of the best forms of recognition include:

  • "A handwritten thank-you card from the chief operating officer"
  • "A new car"
  • "Being named employee of the year"
  • "An all-expenses-paid trip to Jamaica"
  • "A donation to a nonprofit in my name"
  • "A message sent to all employees acknowledging my work"
  • "Baseball playoff tickets behind home plate"
  • "A day off"
  • "A fancy watch"
  • "Being flown to corporate headquarters and receiving a plaque"
  • "An awards show-style event"
  • "A large bonus"
  • "Lunch at a private club"
  • "A key stakeholder sent a complimentary email to my supervisor"
  • "A surprise party after completing a task" 

Source: OfficeTeam

Todd Matthews

Todd Matthews

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